Missouri Credit Union

Project Description

Location:
Columbia and Jefferson City, Missouri

Project Type:
Financial Institution

Size:
3,500 sq. ft. at each location

Construction Cost:
$1.1 million at each location

Completed:
2006

“The building has been well received by our staff, and customers and its success has allowed our company to expand our service to mid-Missouri customers with two additional branches in Jefferson City. The consistent visual aesthetic of each branch facility combined with our commitment to environmentally conscious development (and a branding campaign) has strengthened our image and position in the community.”
Hal James, Missouri Credit Union
  • Many sustainable design features were also incorporated into the design of the Missouri Credit Union in Columbia, Missouri.
  • While providing the Missouri Credit Union site with a pleasant, more natural environment, the landscaping and rain gardens help filter contaminants and pollutants before they enter the storm water system.
  • Located on major thoroughfares, the Missouri Credit Union in Columbia, Missouri is situated on the site to provide multiple entry points and convenient access for drive-through banking.
  • Light-colored materials, banners and a light shelf help to illuminate the interior of Missouri Credit Union in Columbia, Missouri.

Within sight of similar institutions, it was essential for the branch facilities of Missouri Credit Union to stand out from the neighboring developments. The Architects at PWA were asked to accomplish this goal with an energy-efficient building that would respond to the needs of building users and visitors well into the future. Located on major thoroughfares, each facility is situated on the site to provide multiple entry points and convenient access for drive-through banking.

Sustainable Design Highlights:

  • The impervious pavement of the circular drives and parking has been reduced, allowing storm water runoff to be channeled through a detention system in the form of two landscaped rain gardens.
  • Landscaping and rain gardens help filter contaminants and pollutants before they enter the storm water system.
  • Primarily native plants were used for the landscape, with some non-native plants for late fall and winter color.
  • The light-colored paving and building materials reduce the heat island effect by reflecting the heat of the sun.
  • Full cutoff site lighting reduces night sky light pollution and its impact on nocturnal environments.
  • Water conserving plumbing fixtures reduce the burden on municipal water and wastewater systems.
  • A geothermal heating and cooling system, selected to maximize the energy performance of the building, was tested and balanced after construction to ensure maximum operating efficiency.
  • No CFC (chlorofluorocarbon)-based refrigerants were used in the heating and cooling system.
  • A convenient storage and collecting area for recyclable materials was incorporated into the design.
  • Construction materials and finishes maximize the amount of post-consumer and post-industrial recycled content.
  • Regionally available materials reduce the impact on the environment resulting from transportation to the site.